Depression

Ed Welch  - Minibooklet  - Mar 19, 2014

Weary. Hopeless. Numb. Depression seems to strip you of everything you need to even fight against it. 

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Ed Welch  - Minibooklet  - Mar 19, 2014

Lost ambition. Emotional numbness. Fear and withdrawal. Fatigue. Marks of what is commonly called depression.

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Mike Emlet  - Video  - Jun 28, 2013

Mike Emlet sits down and answers the question "How do I help a friend who has suicidal thoughts?"

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Apr 15, 2013

I will never forget the first time suicide came close to me. I met with a young woman who was leaving her mission work in Eastern Europe. She was haunted by an experience but could not even talk about it—my guess was that she was burdened by an inappropriate relationship with a young man who lived there. 

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David Powlison  - Blog Post  - Nov 16, 2012

Let me conclude our series by answering our letter writer’s final question: “What is life really like internally?” What should her emotional experience be like? It can be as variable as the psalms. Some psalms express the “minor key” of pain, threat, and need for God’s help. Some psalms express the “major key” of gratitude, joy, and confidence in the Lord who helps us, the maker of heaven and earth (Psalm 121).

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David Powlison  - Blog Post  - Nov 15, 2012

Our letter writer raises the question of how to sort out whether her sadness is more keyed to self-pity or to longing for Christ to return and to make right what is wrong. She suspects that her experience is not quite an undiluted version of either one. She is then rightly puzzled about how her relationship with God fits in:

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David Powlison  - Blog Post  - Nov 13, 2012

What about the question of temperament? Do “people who tend to be more thoughtful also tend to be sadder”? From one angle that makes sense. For example, Ecclesiastes is a prime example of careful noticing and hard thinking about every little thing that goes on under the sun. One of Solomon’s conclusions is that “in much wisdom is much vexation, and he who increases knowledge increases sorrow” (Ecclesiastes 1:18).

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David Powlison  - Blog Post  - Nov 12, 2012

Is it abnormal to feel saddened by the lovelessness and wrongness of much that happens in life? No. “Every little thing that happens” often contains sorrows. Even with lovely things, there is often a worm in the apple. At minimum, good things do not last—“Pleasures pass but sorrows stay,” as an old saying put it. And many everyday things are plain wrong: backbiting in the workplace, gossip and factions in church, arguing and indifference at home, deceptive dealings in money matters, ill health, friendships that drift apart or turn sour.

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David Powlison  - Blog Post  - Nov 11, 2012

Recently I received the following letter from a woman who raises searching questions about herself and her experience of life

Have you found that people who tend to be more thoughtful also tend to be sadder? I am the type of person who thinks about every little thing that happens— and sometimes I get really sad.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Aug 27, 2012

This sounds way too simple.

When someone has a problem, most of us would prefer to offer help that intrigues, surprises or at least sounds somewhat intelligent. Philippians 4:6 seems to fall short of these goals.

Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.

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