Ed Welch

Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Oct 23, 2013

As a counselor, I have often wanted to personally taste the difficult experiences of others. I know that sometimes people want to talk to a person who has “been there”—who has experienced what they are struggling with.  That’s why I have wanted to taste schizophrenia, quadriplegia, particular physical pain, mania, and most anything foreign to me that I have witnessed in others. Just a taste, of course.

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Ed Welch  - Premium Resource  - Oct 16, 2013

When we help each other, we listen. That is natural in close relationships and it is easy. Could anything be more basic? But, like all other aspects of godly wisdom, listening takes a lifetime to master. We can all do it, but we all want to do it better. This breakout session will draw out one aspect of listening—there are times when we help best by slowing down the person’s telling of the story and getting details.

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Ed Welch  - Premium Resource  - Oct 16, 2013

There are so many images that we can reflect as we care for one another – prophet, priest, king, servant, shepherd, and many others. They are all in Scripture, and they all have their place. As we end the conference we will choose the image of friend as a way to both summarize where we have been and set a course for where we are going.

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Ed Welch  - Premium Resource  - Oct 16, 2013

“Fix your thoughts on Jesus” (Heb.3:1). No matter the topic, this is where we want to land. What does this relational core look like in the life of Jesus? Scripture brings together some of his teachings in places like the Sermon on the Mount, but when the Gospel writers had to condense Jesus’ life so it didn’t fill up all the world’s libraries, they were drawn especially to his personal interactions with people.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Oct 02, 2013

The worst pain is pain that seems outside the reach of Scripture. It is one thing to go through hardships; it is something much worse to go through hardships when Scripture seems silent—when God seems silent. We end up imposing the worst interpretation possible on the hardship, instead of seeing how our suffering is gathered into Scripture’s story of human experience.

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CCEF, David Powlison, Ed Welch, Elyse M. Fitzpatrick, Mike Emlet, Winston Smith  - Premium Resource  - Sep 26, 2013

7 General Sessions.
12 Breakout Sessions.

Includes: David Powlison, Ed Welch, Elyse Fitzpatrick, Mike Emlet, Winston Smith, and more.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Sep 23, 2013

It wasn’t exactly a house call. It was a nursing home call on an eighty-five year old who had talked to me about his depression a handful of times over the last few decades. He was there because the deacons of his church knew that he was not making it on his own and they, with great effort, organized his minimal finances and found him a place that seemed to be better than what he could afford.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Sep 10, 2013

Not Alone is the title of our conference in October, and since we have to actually speak at this conference, we have been talking about it in our CCEF faculty meetings. We are finding, as you would guess, that the topic is a doozy. 

Alone
Is there anything worse than isolation? Solitary confinement remains the worst punishment for an adult; time out is the worst for many children. Betrayal, ridicule, shame, gossip—their power is in how they distance us from others.

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Ed Welch  - Video  - Sep 03, 2013

When we help each other, we listen. That is natural in close relationships and it is easy. Could anything be more basic? But, like all other aspects of godly wisdom, listening takes a lifetime to master. We can all do it, but we all want to do it better. Ed responds to the question "How do I listen well as a friend?" in this short video.

Ed Welch will also be speaking on this topic at this year's national conference Not Alone: The Relational Core of Life and Counseling.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Aug 28, 2013

My familiarity with gratitude goes back to junior high. I knew and respected a young man who was about seven years older than me, and my parents were talking about him and his family.

My mom noticed this young man’s character too. “I asked his mother what she did [to raise such outstanding boys]. She told me, ‘I taught them to say thank you.’” She hoped, I think, that I was listening, and I was.

It was a small awakening for me. Character and thankfulness had intruded into my junior high world. No small feat, indeed.

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