Ed Welch

Edward T. Welch, M.Div., Ph.D. is a counselor and faculty member at CCEF. He earned a Ph.D. in counseling (neuropsychology) from the University of Utah and has a Master of Divinity degree from Biblical Theological Seminary. Ed has been counseling for over 30 years and has written extensively on the topics of depression, fear, and addictions. His books include: When People Are Big and God is Small; Addictions: A Banquet in the Grave; Blame it on the Brain; Depression—A Stubborn Darkness; Running Scared; Crossroads: A Step-by-Step Guide Away From Addiction; and When I Am Afraid: A Step-by-Step Guide Away from Fear and Anxiety.

Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Apr 30, 2015

I am bent toward realistic pessimism. Stock markets will go bad, my health will get worse, and I will die in a way that is not my first preference. These and many other prophecies seem realistic to me, and if I can maintain a certain level of this “Eyore-ness,” they might even ward off some future disappointment (though it seems odd to try to minimize disappointment by living with low-grade version of it now).

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Ed Welch  - Video  - Apr 23, 2015

Ed Welch sits down and discusses our need for one another in the Christian life.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Apr 22, 2015

One of the most frequent questions asked by counseling students is: how do we counsel unbelievers? How do we offer words about Jesus to those who have no commitment to him? 

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Darby Strickland, David Powlison, Ed Welch, Jayne V. Clark, Lauren Whitman, Matthew C. Mitchell, Michael Gembola  - Premium Resource  - Apr 16, 2015

The complete digital issue (PDF) of JBC Volume 29, Number 1

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Ed Welch  - JBC Article  - Apr 16, 2015

Though we tend to avoid talking with others about their sin, God has called us to encourage one another by speaking the truth in love. Ed Welch prepares us to move toward fellow sinners graciously by examining ourselves, learning to see the good in others, and acknowledging hard circumstances. He then gets specific about how to engage with people directly and winsomely. 

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Apr 01, 2015

We always interpret our suffering. A man said, “that is life” in response to his five-year-old son’s death. In other words, like all of nature, we are born and we die. That is life. Life is to die. All suffering is headed toward death. You can imagine that this man’s response had a measure of grief but was governed by fatalism. After the burial, he would get on with life and not look back as he, too, is headed toward death.

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Ed Welch  - Book  - Mar 31, 2015
  • How can we know when a problem is physical or spiritual? 
  • What does the brain actually do, and what happens when it is not working well?
  • How can we better understand those who have brain injuries?
  • When should we refer people to physicians?
  • What are chemical imbalances and what should we know about psychoactive medication?

These and many similar questions are

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Ed Welch  - Premium Resource  - Mar 26, 2015
  • How can we know when a problem is physical or spiritual? 
  • What does the brain actually do, and what happens when it is not working well?
  • How can we better understand those who have brain injuries?
  • When should we refer people to physicians?
  • What are chemical imbalances and what should we know about psychoactive medication?

These and many similar questions are addressed by this book.

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Ed Welch  - Premium Resource  - Mar 26, 2015

“Addictions: Rewriting an Addict’s Story” by Ed Welch explains the inner-world of addictions and the interplay of tests, temptations and sin in the life of an addict. Ed offers a beautiful story of God’s redemption through Christ and how our own stories can be re-written by the power of what Christ has done for us. Included with the audio is a notebook that can be used as a reference while you listen and for reflection later.

Section 1:

The Inner World of Addiction

Section 2:

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Mar 02, 2015

If you are a big-time confessor of sin when you are depressed—and there are a few of you—then please skip this. But if you are prone to depression, and confession is not high on your list, this might help.

The misery of depression is in its apathy. That’s what makes you feel dead. You feel nothing, so you do nothing. Or you feel agitated, but agitation is not the same as passion. Passion wants to do something; agitation is aimless. The skills to take a stand against such inertia certainly are not intrinsic to us. 

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