Ed Welch

Edward T. Welch, M.Div., Ph.D. is a counselor and faculty member at CCEF. He earned a Ph.D. in counseling (neuropsychology) from the University of Utah and has a Master of Divinity degree from Biblical Theological Seminary. Ed has been counseling for over 30 years and has written extensively on the topics of depression, fear, and addictions. His books include: When People Are Big and God is Small; Addictions: A Banquet in the Grave; Blame it on the Brain; Depression—A Stubborn Darkness; Running Scared; Crossroads: A Step-by-Step Guide Away From Addiction; and When I Am Afraid: A Step-by-Step Guide Away from Fear and Anxiety.

Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Feb 05, 2016

The Apostle Paul has a tendency to give us lists of sins. He gives us at least five of them.* At first glance, it feels like he is simply piling it on. But his lists include a recurring structure that brings keen insight into the human condition. He identifies the overarching category of renegade desire, and he typically calls out two expressions of this desire: sexual sin and anger. These are a big deal to Paul because they are a big deal to God.

Here are two of those lists.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Feb 01, 2016

Yes, the title—Counseling Is Theological—is making you sleepy. But let me explain. Theology can, indeed, be boring. Some theological books read like an old encyclopedia article or an oversized dictionary. But theology done well is electric. It reveals to us the very mind of God and it compels us into action. There is nothing more exciting.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Jan 26, 2016

I wrote a book titled, When People are Big and God is Small. Though I haven’t read it for a while, I still think of the topic often and I am left wondering if I have grown over the years.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Nov 17, 2015

This question—Why bother?—is about hope, and the purpose and the value and meaning of everyday life. Some of us can skirt it by staying busy, or finding something we enjoy doing. But many of us have to answer it or we can’t get through the day.

How do you answer the question: Why bother?  Here are a few of the many possibilities.

Because God is good and I will look for and find small pleasures in his name

Ecclesiastes is a good place to begin.

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Ed Welch  - JBC Article  - Nov 16, 2015

This article is centered on the reality that humans are embodied souls. The body is never described in Scripture in moral terms; instead, it is either strong or weak. Its weaknesses can make our lives complicated, difficult and painful, but we can spiritually grow even when the body is compromised. In “Spiritual Growth in the Face of Psychiatric Disorders,” Welch shows what growth in Christ looks like for three people with serious troubles that include a physically-based weakness. 

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Nov 04, 2015

Most of us feel like failures. The experience can be persistent, palpable and intrusive. Or it can be background static (though it is always on standby, just waiting to envelope us). Either way, it seems common to us all. It is so common that we assume it is part of our humanity, so it can go unattended and unexamined.

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Ed Welch  - Premium Resource  - Nov 02, 2015

Ministry was once a task for those who held the offices of prophet, priest and king, or for those with a special anointing. Everything has changed with the resurrection of Jesus Christ, who chose to give the gift of the Spirit to all of his people. Click here to download the outline for this ses

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Ed Welch  - Premium Resource  - Nov 02, 2015

Who would have thought that ministry begins with our own neediness, given all the resources in Scripture that we can give to others? Yet this is the way God brings glory to himself and it is the way the church grows. Click here to download the outline for this session.

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Oct 29, 2015

An eight-year-old boy was angry with his father. As his father was leaving the house, the boy said to him “I hope you don’t come back.”

And he didn’t—a car accident, he died on impact. The boy, now seventy-five, remains haunted by his words.

A child would not fully understand, but an adult does: with life’s uncertainty in mind, we are especially careful with our words and relationships. 

So teach us to number our days that we may get a heart of wisdom. (Ps. 90:12)

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Ed Welch  - Blog Post  - Oct 02, 2015

The psalms teach us how to cry out to the Lord. When we are reluctant and don’t know what to say, they give us words. These words can speak of painful depths and are sometimes quite bold, almost audacious. At other times, they call us to go slowly, to reflect. One way to do that is to know a particular psalm well enough to adapt and paraphrase it. Then, after we make it our own, we can update it in view of Jesus Christ, the one who animates every psalm.

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